How Saving Too Much Can Backfire

Written by Banks Editorial Team
2 min. read
Written by Banks Editorial Team
2 min. read

Over-funding your savings account and saving too much could limit your ability to accumulate wealth. Not everyone has an emergency fund tucked away in savings. In fact, a recent GoBankingRates study identified that 69% of Americans have less than $1,000 available in a savings account, and 34% of this group has no money saved at all. The Federal Reserve Bank recommends that Americans set aside $2,000 to cover an emergency. We could say that Americans are not saving too much, so maybe it’s a good time for you to start and improve these stats.

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How Saving Too Much Can Affect your Wealth?

Conversely, some Americans are saving too much and have a lot of money in savings. Here are some things to have into consideration so saving too much will not affect your wealth.

1. It Doesn’t Mean You Can Significantly Grow Your Money

Today, most savings accounts pay 1% interest or less. This means the money stashed away in your savings account cannot grow in any substantial way. Granted, the purpose of an emergency fund is to have a safety net on hand, but the truth is that some of those funds would be better off invested. You wouldn’t want to fall short when you truly need the money in retirement.

2. Inflation Can Make Your Savings Worth Less Over Time

Risk-averse savers, who steer clear of investing in order to keep their earnings in savings, should note that in the United States, the average rate of inflation is approximately 3%. This means that to avoid losing money, you must plan for a return of at least 3% on your savings at the end of each year.

And while there have been times when interest rates increased to the point of providing more than a 3% return on a savings account, these periods have traditionally been linked to even higher inflation rates than the norm.

In simple terms, savings accounts will very rarely allow consumers to beat inflation. Sound investments will almost always yield much greater returns.

Savings Accounts Providers

26723 Reviews
Read this MoneyLion review about the financial app’s key features, from investing and direct deposits to rebuilding your credit score.
7811 Reviews
Traditional banks aren’t for everyone. Chime offers simple money management, no monthly fees, secure credit building and online banking.
1992 Reviews
Discover Current mobile banking app offering transparent banking on the go, convenient access and high yield savings.

What’s The Ideal Amount of Money to Keep in Savings?

While consumers shouldn’t invest their savings without an adequate emergency fund, it can be difficult to determine the point at which you have enough money saved. Typically, people need three to six months’ worth of living expenses in the bank, although it wouldn’t hurt to save more. For example, if you are self-employed and your income is unpredictable, or if you are the sole earner in your family, then you should aim to save nine months’ worth of living expenses.

In most cases, however, there’s no need to keep more than a year’s worth of cash in your savings account. By overfunding your account, you will limit your ability to compound your money — or earn additional interest based on the increasing value of your investments.

What Are Your Options To Avoid Saving Too Much?

There are a number of ways consumers can invest their money. Investment portfolios, for instance, can generate significant returns. While it takes about 10 years to overcome stock market volatility, you will almost definitely come out ahead in the long term. As discussed, most savings accounts generate a 1% return. Stock-focused portfolios, on the other hand, can earn an 8% return over 30 years.

In addition, consumers can explore traditional brokerage accounts, or IRA and 401(k) accounts on which you only pay taxes when you make a withdrawal in retirement. There are a number of ways to generate significant returns, and still have an emergency fund available to cover any unexpected expenses.

Ultimately, while it’s certainly beneficial to save money, versatility is key. A fixation on growing your savings account can limit your ability to make even more money by investing your income.

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